How to Keep Your Trees Healthy and Thriving

    The state of Georgia loves its trees. Home to more than 250 native species, the trees in Georgia create a green canopy frame for its lush landscape, providing shade during the state’s hot, humid summers.


    Contrary to popular belief, trees grow from the top, not the bottom. Pruning wayward branches can be beneficial to a tree’s health, and that is why professional tree topping in Monroe, GA, and surrounding areas is so important. Improper pruning techniques can damage a tree, or even create a safety hazard.


    A tree’s lifetime extends through decades—centuries, if cared for properly. Trees don’t die of old age, but are killed by insects, disease, and, unfortunately, human beings. For 16 years, we’ve provided care for healthy trees and removal of all types and sizes of dead trees, stumps, tree branches, and brush. We’ve accumulated a wealth of knowledge about the care of trees through our years of experience, and as a result, we’re able to pass on ways homeowners can keep their trees thriving through all four seasons.


    Pests

    Pine bark beetles have wreaked havoc on generations of Georgia’s pine trees, causing millions of dollars in damage. If a tree has been infested by these voracious pests, tree removal may be the only option. Older pines are more susceptible to infestation. A professional tree service can diagnose the level of infestation.


    Japanese beetles attack elm, maple, chestnut, willow, and crape myrtle trees, as well as fruit trees like cherry, plum, and peach trees. However, Japanese beetles also love roses and grapes, and feed on a variety of other plants in the garden. Adult beetles skeletonize the leaves, and are easily detectable. Their season typically lasts 4 to 6 weeks. Insecticides will get rid of the pests.

    Other pests found in Georgia are aphids, scale insects, mealy bugs, white flies and spider mites, which suck sap out of a tree or shrub. There are natural and chemical remedies available to rid a tree of these pests.


    Watering

    Daily random sprays with a water hose may wet the topsoil, but it doesn’t benefit the tree unless ample water reaches its root zone. Hand watering can save water resources during drought by targeting the areas that actually benefit from watering. About 60 gallons of water every three days should be ample, and takes about 12 minutes of watering from a water hose. Soaker hoses work well when applied outside of the drip line—the outermost points on the ground covered by the tree canopy.


    Pruning or Removal

    Poor pruning not only damages a tree, it can turn a beautiful tree into an eyesore—permanently. Over-pruning encourages pest infestation and illness, because it inhibits the tree’s natural defense system. Clean tools should always be used to make clean cuts and to prevent passing any disease or pest problem to another tree. Avoid pruning during times when the tree is stressed, such as drought or other harsh weather patterns.


    Tree removal can be dangerous, so it is best to contact a certified, insured tree removal service when a tree is no longer thriving or is infested. Some professional tree service companies also apply tree fertilizer in Monroe, GA, and the surrounding area during specified times of the year.